Facebook Graph Search with Cypher and Neo4j | Max De Marzi

Facebook Graph Search has given the Graph Database community a simpler way to explain what it is we do and why it matters. I wanted to drive the point home by building a proof of concept of how you could do this with Neo4j. However, I don’t have six months or much experience with NLP (natural language processing). What I do have is Cypher. Cypher is Neo4j’s graph language and it makes it easy to express what we are looking for in the graph.

Four Values Can Still Be Worth A Chart | eagereyes

When you consider all the possible values, what we can see and hear is a very small piece of what’s possible. Originally from Four numbers say little, even on a busy chart via Four Values Can Still Be Worth A Chart | eagereyes.

Massive Cosmic Explosion Struck Medieval Earth | Medieval News

A massive burst of inter-stellar radiation may have stuck the Earth in the middle ages, researchers have announced. It is thought that the explosion occurred when two black holes or neutron stars collided somewhere in the Milky Way. The resultant gamma ray burst sent shockwaves through the galaxy, and hit our planet in the eighth century AD, the German team behind the study told the BBC. It is the latest development of the theory that the middle ages saw a spike in the amount of radiation that can now be found in trees and rocks.

UiO linguist makes sensational claim: English is a Scandinavian language

English really isn’t a Germanic language after all, but Scandinavian. Just because it’s easy for Swedes to learn English? Go figure. Faarlund and his colleague Joseph Emmonds, visiting professor from Palacký University in the Czech Republic, now believe they can prove that English is in reality a Scandinavian language, in other words it belongs to the Northern Germanic language group, just like Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Icelandic and Faroese. This is totally new and breaks with what other language researchers and the rest of the world believe, namely that English descends directly from Old English.

Review of Sweet Tooth

Sweet Tooth by Ian McEwan My rating: 2 of 5 stars I have thoroughly enjoyed some of McEwan’s previous works, including On Chesil Beach, Saturday, and, to a lesser extent, Solar. I found his writing in those works to be beautiful and elegant. Sweet Tooth is my least liked of McEwan’s books. I found the twist at the end insufficient to justify the length of the work, the writing to be less enthralling than his other works, and the plot at times droll.

Typecast

Typecast (beta.typecastapp.com) is a new website from Front designed to make web typography and design easier. Supporting fonts from typekit, fonts.com, Font Desk, and Google web fonts, Typecast provides a simple and flexible formatting solution for blocks of text on a web page. Currently in beta, as of 22 October, the site is open for everyone and free to use. (They will start charging for font use when the site leaves beta.

New fonts

I’ve updated the fonts on this site. TypeKit was fine, but I found several free fonts on www.myfonts.com that I really liked, all with unlimited web usage: Calluna (both Regular and Sans Regular) and Fertigo Pro (Regular).

Ideas Illustrated » Blog Archive » Visualizing English Word Origins

Ideas Illustrated » Blog Archive » Visualizing English Word Origins. Looking at the origin of words and comparing fiction (British and American), medical writing, legal writing, and sports writing. Good thing I have some history with Old English, or I might not understand anything… hahah… and no wonder I don’t understand Medical lit – it’s the least OE-based. A little surprised that Medical lit has more Old French than Legal – would have expected more OF, but maybe the Latin makes up the difference.

Electronic Books & Printed Books: Conflict and Opportunity

I love books, just like Jeff Atwood, who compares electronic books with their age-old printed counterparts, concluding that …unless the publishers are willing to treat eBooks with the same respect and care that they give to their printed books – and most importantly of all, adjust their pricing to reflect the brave new economy of bits, and not an antiquated economy of atoms – they’re destined to eventually suffer the same fate as the Encyclopedia Britannica.

Live Coding example with D3 and Mike Bostock's chord diagram from gabrielflor.it

Bret Victor is a genius. His recent CUSEC 2012 talk, Inventing on Principle, is one of the best talks I’ve ever seen. If you watch only one talk this year, make sure it’s this one. I was blown away by his ‘live coding’ idea, but couldn’t find any actual live examples, so I put together a quick demo using d3 and Ace. I 100% totally based it on Bret’s idea - down to the clever book styling.