Archive for the ‘Arts’ category

Skala Color

April 23rd, 2015

Bjango (http://bjango.com) makes a nice, simple, but very effective color picker for Mac OS X – Skala Color.

Why use a custom color picker? As their website points out – Skala Color provides color values in Hex, CSS RGBA, CSS HSLA, UIColor, NSColor, among others. So, if you’re building a web app, an Android app, or an iOS/OS X app, you’re covered. It is very easy to install and use. Both simple and powerful is an unusual pair of qualities, but Skala Color carries them both off very well. Best of all, the price is right — free!

Bjango also makes several other apps including iStat Mini, a system monitor that fits in the notification window, and Skala Preview that shows “pixel perfect” views for multiple devices. Their “precise user interface and icon design tool”, Skala, is “coming soonish” – but should be worth a serious look, if their other apps are any indication.

Skala Preview - from Bjango media kit

Skala Preview – from Bjango media kit

Decoding Anglo-Saxon art: The British Museum

May 29th, 2014

Rosie Weetch, curator, and Craig Williams, illustrator, British Museum provide a brief guide for understanding the transition of Anglo-Saxon art between the 5th and 11th centuries in a recent blog post on The British Museum’s website. Based on three significant examples (a 6th century Isle of Wight brooch, a Sutton Hoo gold buckle, and the Fuller Brooch), they show how styles shifted from the birds’ heads and often obscure figures to the Trewhiddle Style in the 9th century with the Fuller Brooch. A fascinating and brief view into some beautiful works of art.

Sutton Hoo gold buckle; Source: The British Museum blog (5/28/2014)

Codex Sinaiticus added to BL digitised manuscript collection

March 24th, 2014

Codex Sinaiticus (detail) (Source: julianharrison.typepad.com)

From http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/digitisedmanuscripts/2014/03/codex-sinaiticus-added-to-digitised-manuscripts.html

Codex Sinaiticus is one of the great treasures of the British Library. Written in the mid-4th century in the Eastern Mediterranean (possibly at Caesarea), it is one of the two oldest surviving copies of the Greek Bible, along with Codex Vaticanus, in Rome. Written in four narrow columns to the page (aside from in the Poetic books, in two columns), its visual appearance is particularly striking. – See more at: http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/digitisedmanuscripts/2014/03/codex-sinaiticus-added-to-digitised-manuscripts.html#sthash.n8q28qlL.dpuf