Archive for January, 2013

Facebook Graph Search with Cypher and Neo4j | Max De Marzi

January 31st, 2013

Facebook Graph Search has given the Graph Database community a simpler way to explain what it is we do and why it matters. I wanted to drive the point home by building a proof of concept of how you could do this with Neo4j. However, I don’t have six months or much experience with NLP (natural language processing). What I do have is Cypher. Cypher is Neo4j’s graph language and it makes it easy to express what we are looking for in the graph. I needed a way to take “natural language” and create Cypher from it. This was going to be a problem.

via Facebook Graph Search with Cypher and Neo4j | Max De Marzi.

The article is an interesting introduction to treetop (a “language for describing languages” used in Semr, a “framework to [support] natural language processing”) and how Mr. De Marzi uses it to create a simple Facebook Graph-like search using Neo4j. Very slick.

Four Values Can Still Be Worth A Chart | eagereyes

January 26th, 2013

 

 

When you consider all the possible values, what we can see and hear is a very small piece of what’s possible.

Originally from Four numbers say little, even on a busy chart via Four Values Can Still Be Worth A Chart | eagereyes.

Massive Cosmic Explosion Struck Medieval Earth | Medieval News

January 25th, 2013

A massive burst of inter-stellar radiation may have stuck the Earth in the middle ages, researchers have announced. It is thought that the explosion occurred when two black holes or neutron stars collided somewhere in the Milky Way. The resultant gamma ray burst sent shockwaves through the galaxy, and hit our planet in the eighth century AD, the German team behind the study told the BBC. It is the latest development of the theory that the middle ages saw a spike in the amount of radiation that can now be found in trees and rocks. In 2012 a Japanese team found that ancient cedar trees had high levels of carbon-14, an isotope which is created when radiation strikes atoms in our upper atmosphere. Further research on radiation found in ice in the USA pinned the explosion down to between 774 and 775 AD. An entry in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle for the year 774 reads: “This year also appeared in the heavens a red crucifix, after sunset; the Mercians and the men of Kent fought at Otford; and wonderful serpents were seen in the land of the South-Saxons.”

via Massive Cosmic Explosion Struck Medieval Earth | Medieval News.

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